Cox, John

Cox, John
Associate Professor of International Studies; Director, Center for HGHR Studies
Hickory 23B
Category: 
Discipline: Modern European and world history; comparative genocide studies

Areas of expertise: The Holocaust, modern genocide, racism and imperialism, working-class & labor history, and resistance

CV: https://uncc.academia.edu/JCox/CurriculumVitae

Dr. Cox's first book (Circles of Resistance: Jewish, Leftist, and Youth Dissidence in Nazi Germany) was published in 2009, and his To Kill a People: Genocide in the Twentieth Century was published in February 2016 by Oxford University Press. John earned his Ph.D. in History at UNC-Chapel Hill in 2006 and came to UNC Charlotte in 2011, after teaching History for five years at Florida Gulf Coast University, where he founded and directed a Holocaust & human rights studies center.

His current research projects analyze anti-Nazi resistance within Buchenwald and the post-war memory and political uses of that resistance; Jewish participation in the fight against Franco in Spain; and the relationship of capitalism to genocide. Dr. Cox is also co-editing a major genocide-studies reader (The Routledge Handbook of Genocide Studies) with Adam Jones, to be published in 2019 or 2020. 

Dr. Cox directs our department's Center for Holocaust, Genocide & Human Rights (HGHR) Studies and administers our minor in HGHR Studies. Upcoming events organized or co-sponsored by the Center.

His Academia.edu site: https://uncc.academia.edu/JCox

 

Published in February 2016: https://global.oup.com/academic/product/to-kill-a-people-9780190236472?q=cox&lang=en&cc=us#

With Dr. Anabel Buchenau of UNCC, Dr. Charles Kurzman of UNC, poet/writer Susan Sailer of West Virginia Univ., and Zack Rushk Zubair at "Witness in Residence" program, April 2017

"Peace in the Park: United against Violence, from Ferguson to Paris to Chapel Hill," March 2015, downtown Charlotte

In Barcelona, May 2011, with veteran of the Civil War. He fought with a revolutionary militia (POUM) and later survived the Nazis' infamous Mauthausen concentration camp.

In Charleston, SC, a few days after the June 17, 2015 massacre